News & Events

matt c photoMatt Carmichael is a seasoned journalist, author and speaker who specializes in demographics, consumer trends, and urban issues.

He is the editor of Livability.com, one of the nation’s top ratings and rankings organizations, which focuses on what makes small and mid-sized cities great places to live and work.

Previously he was Senior director of research and data at Crain’s Chicago Business and Director of data strategy at Advertising Age. The American Consumer Project he created for Ad Age became the foundation for first book, “Buyographics: How demographic and economic changes will reinvent the way marketers reach consumers.”

He has been awarded top honors in journalism competitions for content, design and innovative uses of technology. His research has been cited by global media outlets including the Wall Street Journal, and the Atlantic. A prolific writer and photographer, his work has appeared in more than 100 media outlets globally.

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What should the new campus look and feel like?

Join Bend 2030 and OSU-Cascades leaders to share your vision for the new campus at four interactive and fun workshops in April held in each district of Bend.

Come see preliminary campus models and plans. Use clickers to weigh in on big questions. Ask questions of OSU-Cascades planning team. And offer your insights for making this campus the best it can be.

These convenient and casual workshops are designed to be fun with free appetizers and in most locations, a no-host bar.

Bend 2030 will share input from the workshops with OSU-Cascades in a report later this spring. Your ideas will assist the design team in planning a university campus that reflects the values and needs of the Central Oregon community, and also reflects the institution’s academic, research and community service priorities.

 

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO REGISTER TO ATTEND FOR FREE!

riverbendNORTHEAST BEND
Wednesday, April 13
5-7:30 p.m.
Riverbend Brewing
2650 NE Division St.

 

Broken Top Bottle ShopNORTHWEST BEND
Thursday, April 14
5-7:30 p.m.
Broken Top Bottle Shop
1740 NW Pence Lane

 
La Rosa logoSOUTHWEST BEND
Wednesday, April 20
5-7:30 p.m.
La Rosa
Brookswood Plaza, 19570 Amber Meadow Dr.

 

kelly ds  logoSOUTHEAST BEND 
Thursday, April 21
5-7:30 p.m.
Kelly D’s Irish Pub
1012 SE Cleveland Ave.

 
For more information contact:

Erin Foote Marlowe
Bend 2030 Executive Director
541-420-8603

erinfootemarlowe@gmail.com

 

 

IMAGE 1

What should the new campus look and feel like?

Join Bend 2030 and OSU-Cascades leaders to share your vision for the new campus at four interactive and fun workshops in April held in each district of Bend.

Come see preliminary campus models and plans. Use clickers to weigh in on big questions. Ask questions of OSU-Cascades planning team. And offer your insights for making this campus the best it can be.

These convenient and casual workshops are designed to be fun with free appetizers and in most locations, a no-host bar.

Bend 2030 will share input from the workshops with OSU-Cascades in a report later this spring. Your ideas will assist the design team in planning a university campus that reflects the values and needs of the Central Oregon community, and also reflects the institution’s academic, research and community service priorities.

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO REGISTER TO ATTEND FOR FREE!

NORTHEAST BENDriverbend
Wednesday, April 13
5-7:30 p.m.
Riverbend Brewing
2650 NE Division St.

 

Broken Top Bottle ShopNORTHWEST BEND
Thursday, April 14
5-7:30 p.m.
Broken Top Bottle Shop
1740 NW Pence Lane

 

 

La Rosa logoSOUTHWEST BEND
Wednesday, April 20
5-7:30 p.m.
La Rosa
Brookswood Plaza, 19570 Amber Meadow Dr.

 

kelly ds logoSOUTHEAST BEND 
Thursday, April 21
5-7:30 p.m.
Kelly D’s Irish Pub
1012 SE Cleveland Ave.

 

 

For more information contact:

Erin Foote Marlowe 
Bend 2030 Executive Director
541-420-8603

erinfootemarlowe@gmail.com

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The land in front of the school district administration building is the proposed site of “Heritage Square.”

The possible sale of Troy Field, a grassy field in downtown Bend near City Hall and the school district building, to private developers is prompting interest in resurrecting a longtime plan to create “Heritage Square.”

This square has been part of city plans for more than a decade and would likely be located on what is currently a parking lot owned by the district between its administration building and City Hall.

Bend 2030 has been gathering information from community members who see Heritage Square as a possible answer to the need for public, open space in the downtown core if Troy Field is sold to the private development firm that has expressed interest in creating a hotel or condominiums on the site of the grassy field.

On Monday, Dec. 7, Bend 2030 sent a letter of inquiry to the school board regarding its hopes for the future of Heritage Square and the challenges that must be addressed before it can be built.

Bend 2030 is hopeful that any response from the district will help the community understand the opportunities and difficulties presented by Heritage Square and we look forward to being partners in finding community-supported solutions to addressing any needs standing in the way of building this valuable community asset.

Bend 2030 is pleased to announce our involvement in an important new pilot project designed to build the capacity of Bend’s neighborhood associations.
This one-year, $20,000 contract was awarded to Bend 2030 by the City of Bend, allowing us to hire talented project manager Jen Rusk of Rusk Coaching and Consulting.
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Jen Rusk of Rusk Coaching and Consulting

Jen’s work history shows the long list of nonprofits and organizations she’s worked with throughout Central Oregon over the past 10 years. We are extremely fortunate to match her expertise and experience with this project.
Between now and next November, Jen will work directly with associations to support neighborhood leaders’ training, leadership, communication and recruitment needs.
We are so pleased to join Jen and the City of Bend to play a role in strengthening these critical community organizations.
If you are interested in joining your own neighborhood association, please check out the City of Bend’s webpage to learn what association represents your area.

(The following is an In My View op-ed sent to The Bulletin after the publication of an editorial regarding Bend 2030 on Nov. 18. Review The Bulletin editorial by clicking this link.)

To engage and empower the community to achieve our Vision.

This is the mission of Bend 2030.

It’s powerful. It’s effective. And it’s a responsibility unlike any other.

Ten years ago, thousands of Bend residents—in fact, one in seven—came together around whiteboards, conference tables, and giant sheets of butcher paper to do the work of hammering out a long-range strategic plan for Bend.

The product of their work, which was endorsed by a statistically validated survey of the entire community, was called the Bend 2030 Vision. A 50-page document outlining Bend residents’ expectations for economic development, planning and infrastructure, environmental quality, education and the arts, wellness, and the depth of our community ties such as those created by strong neighborhoods.

The project was funded by the City of Bend, whose City Council believed in the value of a road map for tracking whether city policy was in step with our community goals.

Today, every time the City Council enacts new policy, they must ask themselves—does this work achieve our community vision? If yes, a box called Bend 2030 Vision is checked. If not, this box on their worksheets is left blank and Councilors must pause to consider if there is better work to be done.

This method of being responsible to the public is powerful. It’s effective.

And so is the work of Bend 2030.

Recently, the Bulletin editorial board described Bend 2030 as an organization just like any other advocacy group.

That is incorrect.

Bend 2030 has been charged with maintaining and enhancing the livability of our town, with accomplishing our agreed-upon strategic plan, and with achieving the will of the people by engaging the people. No other organization has been vested with this responsibility on behalf of Bend’s collective future.

Here’s how we carry it out.

First we rely on funding and insight from our Leadership Alliance, representing an intentionally broad cross-section of business and civic leadership including Bend Broadband, Brooks Resources, Deschutes Brewery, Harcourts The Garner Group, Northwest Crossing, and Sunwest Builders; public agencies such as Bend Park and Recreation District, Central Oregon Community College, OSU-Cascades, St. Charles Health System, and the U.S. Forest Service; and yes, the City of Bend, which has contributed just $15,000 to the organization since it became a nonprofit in 2007.

Building upon the collective wisdom of community leaders from these companies and agencies, Bend 2030’s board of directors determines the greatest challenges standing in the way of achieving the Vision. Affordable housing, transportation and OSU-Cascades are currently at the top of our priority list.

Then we ask the public: “What do you think?,” to develop the most broadly supported solutions for solving these problems. We engage thousands of residents to find the answers.

The information we get back through questionnaires to stakeholders, forums, scientifically validated surveys, and online open-to-anyone surveys creates Bend 2030 policy recommendations. We offer these recommendations directly to decision-makers such as City Councilors through council presentations, one-on-one meetings, committee work, and reports.

It’s a model that works. For instance, all but one of our housing affordability recommendations from 2015 have been adopted, and the other is slated for approval next spring.

We are fortunate to have had city leadership that recognizes the value of a long-range plan and the need for an organization devoted to accomplishing it. At a time when we face daunting and difficult growth we have never needed a group like this more.

Bend 2030 is a nonprofit without a membership agenda, with nothing to gain for our board members, with no financial motivation of its own. It is an organization devoted to one mission alone: to engage and empower the public to achieve our Vision for this place.

We look forward to continuing our work with partners such as the City of Bend to execute it effectively.

By Erin Foote Marlowe

Bend 2030 Executive Director

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BEND, Nov. 13, 2015— Bend 2030’s board of directors voted unanimously Friday to support the findings of the Streets Funding Committee, which include support for a fuel tax and multimodal project funding.

The board captured the decision in a letter titled Bend 2030 Supports Fuel Tax and Multimodal Funding and sent it to the Bend City Council, which will meet tonight, to further consider where to find funding to improve Bend’s deteriorating road system.

“Through a transportation forum attended by 175 people, a statistically valid survey and community survey, and through our role as a co-convener of the Streets Funding Committee, Bend 2030 has engaged thousands of residents in finding the most broadly supported solutions to funding an improved transportation system in Bend,” reads the letter. “The overwhelming message from these thousands of residents: adequately fund street preservation through a combination of funding sources including a fuel tax, and develop funding sources to greatly enhance multimodal options in the city.”

Funding for Bend 2030 is provided by the generous support of the Leadership Alliance of Bend 2030, including BendBroadband, Bend Park and Recreation District, Brooks Resources, Central Oregon Community College, the City of Bend, Deschutes Brewery, OSU-Cascades, St. Charles Health System, U.S. Forest Service, and Harcourt The Garner Group/Sunwest Builders/NorthWest Crossing.

streets with potholesThe City will likely seek $6 to $7 million annually for street preservation after hearing on Monday from the Streets Funding Committee, which concluded its work this week. Bend 2030 was instrumental in the creation of the committee earlier this summer after pulling together a coalition that requested the Bend City Council collect more community input before moving forward on a gas tax ballot measure.

The committee worked with City staff to identify about $3 million from the City’s general fund that could fund preservation of streets. The committee also confirmed that a gas tax is the preferred option for raising the $6 to $7 million needed to improve the quality of streets. In a strong move forward for multimodal needs the committee also recommended the use of more than $2 million in system development money to fund at least two bike and pedestrian safety projects. The group also advised that a funding source for additional multimodal projects must be found by the end of 2017 if not sooner.

Bend 2030 is joining forces with a stellar line-up of partners to put on the Bend Livability Project, a major three-day event scheduled for June 2016. Timed to coincide with the submittal of our urban growth boundary proposal to the State, the conference is part celebration and part townhall meeting.

Through education, tangible tool-building workshops, and civic engagement we will empower this community to shape the growth that’s coming. Over the weekend expect to see tracts in housing, transportation and neighborhood livability. Expect community art projects, films, walking tours. Expect to be inspired about the future of Bend.

Contact Bend 2030 ED Erin Foote Marlowe at erinfootemarlowe@gmail.com to join the conference steering committee currently made up of Central Oregon Association of Realtors, City Club of Central Oregon, City of Bend, Building a Better Bend, American Institute of Architects, the Bend Chamber of Commerce, and Age-Friendly Bend.